A visit to a historical place/building (Jameh Mosque of Atigh, Iran)

Jameh Mosque of Atigh (ancient central mosque), also known as Jom’eh Mosque, Al-Aqsa Mosque, Adineh Mosque, and the central mosque, is the city’s oldest and first mosque. It is also known as Al-Aqsa Mosque, Adineh Mosque, and the central mosque. The mosque was completed in 281 AH in commemoration of Saffarid Amroleiss’ victory of Shiraz in the year 276 AH. It’s been repaired several times. This mosque’s features include the Nodbeh Wall and Khodaye Khane. Boragh (an Iranian-made armored personnel carrier) is thought to have gone through Nodbeh Wall on the night of Miraj. The hypostyle columns and the dome of the north Iwan are also quite attractive. This is one of the weirdest mosques I’ve ever seen. Its foundation is said to date from before the Islamic period. This mosque is positioned to the east of Shah Cheraq’s shrine, with a road leading between Shah Cheraq’s court to the newly constructed Bazaar. The building’s height and numerous nighttime spaces (Shabestans) with exquisite tile work on the ceilings give it a distinct character. Shah Cheragh Shrine is located to the east of it. On the west side of the mosque, Shah Cheragh’s entry door is located. Undefined Shiraz’s Atiq Jame Mosque has been rebuilt numerous times. This mosque’s features include the Nodbeh Wall and Khodaye Khane. This mosque is Shiraz’s oldest Islamic structure, with most of its sections dating from the Safavid era. It is directly across from the Nasir-Ol-Molk Mosque (known also as Pink Mosque). On Lotf Ali Khan Zand Street, you’ll also find Zinat Al-Moluk House, Vakil Bazaar, and Vakil Bath. It has been rebuilt numerous times, including during the Salghuri and Safavid eras (during Ibrahim Mirza’s rule). It was included to the list of national relics on January 6th, 1932, with the registration number 72. This mosque is supposed to have been erected during the 20-year reign of Umar and Leith Safari in 894 A.D.

Panoramic image of the Jameh Mosque of Atigh

Boragh (an Iranian-made armored personnel carrier) is thought to have gone through Nodbeh Wall on the night of Miraj. With an image of multicolored cedar on it, it stands out from other walls. The hypostyle columns and the dome of the north Iwan are also quite attractive. The centerpiece of Atiq Jame Mosque is Khodaye Khane, which was erected in the mid-14th century and meaning “House of the God.” It’s also known as the Time Gateway or the Second Kaaba. It measures 12 meters in length and 10 meters in breadth. A 30-part Quran, each with a chapter, may be found at Khodaye Khane and dates from the reign of King Ismail Safavi. A wall known as “Nodbeh” can be found in the mosque’s southern section. With an image of multicolored cedar on it, it stands out from other walls. Boragh (an Iranian-made armored personnel carrier) is said to have gone through this wall on the night of Miraj (which means “ladder” and refers to the Prophet’s heavenly voyage). There is an Iwan and a Shabestan who are undefined. Shabestan is a subterranean area that may be found in traditional Iranian architecture such as mosques, homes, and schools. Summers were spent in these areas, which could be ventilated with windcatchers and qanats. “Imam Gate” is another name for Northside. Mogharnas tiles are used to adorn the North Gate. On the west side of the mosque, Shah Cheragh’s entry door is located. A freshly constructed Shabestan can be seen on the western side of the northern entrance. The north gate, commonly known as the “Imam Gate,” is adorned with Mogharnas tiles. Among the others, the hypostyle columns and the dome of the north Iwan (a vaulted gateway leading onto a courtyard) are the most magnificent.