A Planet Half Venus’ Mass and Hints of Habitability Found in Amazing Planetary System

The L98-59 system has become a particularly desirable destination for planetary astronomers. Despite recent advances, human observations are not happening soon, but space telescopes have revealed an interesting planet – one of the lightest ever found, which is probably 30 percent water and a sign that it is perfectly fit for life. By 2019, L98-59 was another dwarf star among many although 35 light-years away, it was close to galaxy values. Then, discovering the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) L96-59b, is 20 percent smaller than the smallest planet-Earth found. Finding these little planets around distant stars is a wonderful technical challenge.

TESS has found two planets 40 and 60 percent larger than our home. However, L98-59b does not match Kepler-37b, the smallest exoplanet ever found, closer to the moon in size than Mercury. Now, a large team of researchers led by Dr. Olivier Demangeon of the University of Porto has used a very large telescope (VLT) to explore the system more deeply. In astronomy and astronomy, they have added a lot of information about the Earth that TESS found and at least one missed it making the system a rival Trapist-1 is the most interesting to find so far. Just as it is difficult to find small planets using transit methods, radial velocity detection (also called Doppler wave) struggles to detect low-mass worlds.

A Planet Half Venus’ Mass and Hints of Habitability Found in Amazing Planetary System

However, observations of the movement of L 96-59 by VLT reveal that L 96-59b has less than half the mass of Venus the lightest object ever detected in this way. The density of L 96-59b is determined by measuring the size of the TESS and comparing the mass obtained by VLT Demangeon with a stimulus light of 3.6 g / cm3, two-thirds of Mercury or Earth. The concentration of L 98-59c is not below the inner planet of the Sun. More interesting is that the concentration of L98-59D is only 2.95 g / cm3, which suggests that it, can be 30 percent water, despite the temperature above the surface.

TESS’s discoveries are that all orbits around L 98-59 that, even if it allows us to be much weaker than the Sun, get much more heat to be habitable. However, VLT has identified a specific fourth planet, L98-59E, and a potential fifth (which is called 05 until confirmed), which is suspected to have orbited at a suitable distance for surface water. Demangeon said in a statement, “We have an indication of the presence of a terrestrial planet in the habitable zone of this system.”